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Mark Wilmot BeachBumHomes.com, Realtor, Ventura, Oxnard, Malibu. Real Estate Website, Compass Real Estate


 
 
 
 

Surging Mortgage Rates Spook House Hunters

Borrowing costs have climbed to their highest level since 2008, sending shock waves through the housing market.

June 17, 2022

Mortgage rates have climbed to their highest level since 2008, pinching home buyers’ budgets. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.78% this week, way above its 2.93% average just one year ago, Freddie Mac reports. The Federal Reserve’s decision Wednesday to raise its key benchmark rate by the highest amount in 28 years sent shock waves through financial markets, including adding further pressure on mortgage rates.

“These rising mortgage rates hurt affordability and decrease the purchasing power of many buyers,” Nadia Evangelou, senior economist and director of forecasting at the National Association of REALTORS®, wrote on the association’s blog. “In addition to increasing the amount buyers will pay to borrow for their mortgage, higher interest rates lower their purchasing power since a larger portion of their monthly payment will be put toward interest.”

This means more buyers must readjust their home-shopping budgets, as the impact of higher rates translates to a 25% drop in house hunters’ purchasing power since the beginning of the year. For example, a typical buyer could afford a $360,000 home with a $1,400 monthly mortgage payment at the beginning of the year. Now, with near-6% mortgage rates, a $1,400 monthly payment translates to a $270,000 home.

Where Do Rates Go From Here?

This week’s 5.78% average for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is up from 5.23% last week. Every bit of that bump is being felt by home buyers, economists say. For example, a $300,000 loan with a rate of 5.23% would cost a borrower about $1,653 per month (excluding taxes and insurance). That same loan at this week’s 5.78% average would cost $1,756—an extra $1,236 a year, says Jacob Channel, LendingTree’s senior economist.

The latest increase in mortgage rates has largely been attributed to the Fed’s hike of 75 basis points to its key benchmark rate. “It’s possible that this large increase could be somewhat of an over-correction on the part of lenders, and, as a result, it may fall somewhat over the coming weeks as lenders better adjust to the current high-inflation environment,” Channel says. “Mortgage rates have already risen considerably higher and faster than what most predicted they would at the start of the year—and, as evidenced by today’s latest figures, lenders have shown a willingness to continue to raise rates, even as homebuyer demand falls.”

Mortgage applications for home purchases—viewed as a gauge of future homebuying activity—are down 16% year over year, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.

Hikes Across the Board

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for mortgage rates for the week ending June 16:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.78%, with an average 0.9 point, rising from last week’s 5.23% average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 2.93%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.81%, with an average 0.9 point, increasing from last week’s 4.38% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.24%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 4.33%, with an average 0.3 point, rising from last week’s 4.12% average. A. year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.52%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining a mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Turn Upward Again

The reversal after declines over the last three weeks has economists closely watching for the Fed’s anticipated rate hike next week.

June 10, 2022
 

Following three weeks of declines, mortgage rates reversed course and headed back up this week. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.23% for the week ending June 9; a year ago, it averaged below 3%.

Increased economic activity and incoming inflation data were behind the most recent rate increases this week, says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The housing market is incredibly rate sensitive, so as mortgage rates increase suddenly, demand again is pulling back,” he says. “The material decline in purchase activity combined with the rising supply of homes for sale will cause a deceleration in price growth to more normal levels, providing some relief for buyers still interested in purchasing a home.”

Fed’s Anticipated Rate Hike Looms

Economists will watch the Federal Reserve’s actions closely this coming week. The central bank is largely expected to raise its key benchmark rate at its next meeting, June 14-15.

“Ahead of May’s inflation reading, investors are concerned about inflation and the impact of an upcoming half-percentage point rate hike from the Federal Reserve next week,” Nadia Evangelou, senior economist and director of forecasting for the National Association of REALTORS®, writes on the association’s blog. However, “the upcoming rate hike will likely have a smaller impact on mortgage rates this time.”

In March, when the Federal Reserve raised its short-term interest rates, mortgage rates surged 80 basis points in the following three weeks, Evangelou notes. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage jumped from 3.85% to 4.67% by the end of March. In May, when the Federal Reserve raised its interest rates even more aggressively, mortgage rates rose by less than 20 basis points. By the end of May, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.10%.

“It seems that mortgage rates have already priced in some of the effects of the upcoming Fed’s rate hikes,” Evangelou explains. She is forecasting mortgage rates to average 5.6% to 5.7% by late 2022.

Snapshot of Mortgage Rates

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending June 9:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.23%, with an average 0.9 point, increasing from last week’s 5.09% average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 2.96%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.38%, with an average 0.8 point, rising slightly from last week’s 4.32% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.23%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 4.12%, with an average 0.3 point, increasing from last week’s 4.04% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.55%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining the mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Hold Mostly Flat This Week

June 3, 2022

The interest rate for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.09% this week, continuing to inch down slightly. Still, rates are up significantly compared to a year ago. Due to the higher rates, home buyers need to earn about $30,000 more if they want to buy the typical home now compared to a year ago, Nadia Evangelou, National Association of REALTORS®’ senior economist and director of forecasting, writes on the association’s blog.

The higher rates are slowing the housing market. Mixed with higher home prices, home buyers are facing escalating costs that is affecting affordability. Existing-home sales have dropped for the last three months, according to NAR’s data.

“Heading into the summer, the potential homebuyer pool has shrunk, supply is on the rise, and the housing market is normalizing,” notes Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “This is welcome news following unprecedented market tightness over the last couple years.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending June 2:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.09%, with an average 0.8 point, falling from last week’s 5.10% average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 2.99%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.32%, with an average 0.8 point, rising slightly from last week’s 4.31% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.27%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 4.04%, with an average 0.3 point, dropping from last week’s 4.20% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.64%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront costs of obtaining the mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Reach Highest Levels Since 2009

May 6, 2022

The 30-year fixed rate mortgage averaged 2.96% just a year ago; this week, it averages 5.27%, Freddie Mac reports.

“Mortgage rates resumed their climb this week as the 30-year fixed reached its highest point since 2009,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “While housing affordability and inflationary pressures pose challenges for potential buyers, house price growth will continue but is expected to decelerate in the coming months.”

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending May 5:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.27%, with an average 0.9 point, rising from last week’s 5.10% average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 2.96%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.52%, with an average 0.8 point, increasing from last week’s 4.40% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.30%.
  • 5-year adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.96%, with an average 0.2 point, climbing from last week’s 3.78% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.70%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average point to better reflect the total upfront costs of obtaining a mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Average 5.10% This Week

April 29, 2022

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage barely budged this week, but it’s still stressing home shoppers feeling concern about being priced out. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.10%, down slightly from 5.11% last week, Freddie Mac reports.

But it is one week before the Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates further, Nadia Evangelou, National Association of REALTORS® senior economist and director of forecasting, says on the association’s blog. The Fed’s key rate does not have a direct impact on mortgage rates but it does often influence them.

Borrowers may be getting nervous about how high rates could go. Higher rates already are forcing them to increase their budgets. Current buyers need to spend about $25,000 more to buy a comparable home this year than a year ago, Evangelou says.

“The combination of swift home price growth and the fastest mortgage rate increase in over 40 years is finally affecting purchase demand,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Home buyers navigating the current environment are coping in a variety of ways, including switching to adjustable-rate mortgages, moving away from expensive coastal cities, and looking to more affordable suburbs. We expect the decline in demand to soften home price growth to a more sustainable pace later this year.

NAR has predicted a 10% drop in home sales for 2022.

Still, while panic continues over higher mortgages, economists note that rates remain lower than historical averages. In 2002, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was about 7%, which is much higher than this week’s average of 5.10%.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending April 28:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.10%, with an average 0.8 point, falling from last week’s 5.11% average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 2.98%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.40%, with an average 0.9 point, increasing from last week’s 4.38% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.31%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.78%, with an average 0.3 point, increasing from last week’s 3.75% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.64%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront costs of obtaining a mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Rise for Seventh Straight Week

April 22, 2022

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.11% this week, continuing its rapid rise, Freddie Mac reports. The higher borrowing costs are forcing home buyers to expand their budgets.

With higher rates and home prices, house hunters need to earn about $25,000 extra if they want to buy the typical home now compared to a year earlier, Nadia Evangelou, senior economist and director of forecasting at the National Association of REALTORS®, writes for the association’s blog. Existing-home sales are dropping as a result.

Rising Treasury yields are putting pressure on mortgage rates, says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “While springtime is typically the busiest homebuying season, the upswing in rates has caused some volatility in demand,” Khater says. “It continues to be a seller’s market, but buyers who remain interested in purchasing a home may find that competition has moderately softened.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending April 21:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 5.11%, with an average 0.8 points, rising from last week’s 5%. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 2.97%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.38%, with an average 0.8 points, increasing from last week’s 4.17% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.29%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.75%, with an average 0.3 points, increasing from last week’s 3.69% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.83%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining the mortgage.

 

 

Borrowing Costs Jump as Rates Continue to Increase

April 1, 2022

For the fourth consecutive week, mortgage rates surged, up more than 90 basis points in one month.

Rates have jumped from 3.76% to 4.67% in just March alone, significantly increasing the borrowing costs for buyers, Nadia Evangelou, senior economist and director of forecasting at the National Association of REALTORS®, wrote for the association’s blog.

The monthly payment for a median-priced home with a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rose more than $170 in March due to higher rates, Evangelou notes.

In the past three months, that amount has been increasing even more. For example, LendingTree offers the following example: A 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage loan worth $300,000 would have cost a buyer about $1,283 a month with the average rate on Dec. 30, 2021, of 3.11%. But at the current average rate of 4.67%, that monthly cost has jumped to $1,551—an increase of $268 a month, $3,216 a year, and $96,480 over the lifetime of the loan.

Still, even with the latest jump in mortgage rates, borrowing costs do remain low by historical standards. From 2002 up until 2009, rates generally were between 5% and 6.5%, LendingTree notes.

However, buyers are facing higher asking prices for homes, and rates are projected to continue inching up.

“Mortgage rates continued moving upward in the face of rapidly rising inflation as well as the prospect of strong demand for goods and ongoing supply disruptions,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Purchase demand has weakened modestly but has continued to outpace expectations. This is largely due to unmet demand from first-time homebuyers as well as a select few who had been waiting for rates to hit a cyclical low.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending March 31:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.67%, with an average 0.8 points, rising from last week’s 4.42%. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.18%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.83%, with an average 0.8 points, up from last week’s 3.63% average. A year ago at this time, 15-year rates averaged 2.45%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.50%, with an average 0.3 points, up from last week’s 3.36%. A year ago, 5-year ARMS averaged 2.84%.

Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining the mortgage.

 

 

Mortgage Rates Continue to Climb

March 18, 2022

As mortgage rates rise, levels below 4% for the most popular 30-year fixed-rate mortgage are likely to remain in the rearview mirror. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.16% this week, Freddie Mac reports.

“The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage exceeded 4% for the first time since May of 2019,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The Federal Reserve raising short-term rates and signaling further increases means mortgage rates should continue to rise over the course of the year. While home purchase demand has moderated, it remains competitive due to low existing inventory, suggesting high house price pressures will continue during the spring homebuying season.”

Higher mortgage rates are likely to affect many aspiring home buyers, especially first-timers, says Nadia Evangelou, NAR’s senior economist and director of forecasting, on the association’s blog. Since the beginning of this year, nearly 6.3 million households have been priced out of the housing market, 2 million of whom are millennials.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending March 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.16%, with an average 0.8 point, up from last week’s 3.85% average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.09%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.39%, with an average 0.8 point, increasing from last week’s 3.09% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.40%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.19%, with an average 0.2 point, increasing from last week’s 2.97% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.79%.
  • Freddie Mac reports commitment rates along with average points to better reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining a mortgage.

 

 

Rates Drop Amid Russia-Ukraine Conflict

March 4, 2022

Mortgage rates fell again this week amid Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, sparking uncertainty across the globe including in U.S. markets. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped to a 3.76% average this week, Freddie Mac reports.

“Geopolitical tensions caused U.S. Treasury yields to recede this week as investors moved to the safety of bonds, leading to a drop in mortgage rates,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “While inflationary pressures remain, the cascading impacts of the war in Ukraine have created market uncertainty. Consequently, rates are expected to stay low in the short term but will likely increase in the coming months.”

The National Association of REALTORS® echoed that sentiment. Nadia Evangelou, NAR’s senior economist and director of forecasting, wrote on the association’s blog that rates likely will rise soon as the Fed remains on course to raise its short-term interest rates in order to control inflation.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending March 3:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.76%, with an average 0.8 point, dropping from last week’s 3.89% average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.02%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.01%, with an average 0.8 point, falling from last week’s 3.14% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.34%.
  • 5-year adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 2.91%, with an average 0.3 point, dropping from last week’s 2.98% average. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.73%.

 

 

 
 

Mark Wilmot Realtor® Compass Real Estate

Ventura/L.A. Counties

Lic#01733107 805-279-3038

www.BeachBumLiving.com/ www.MarkWilmot.com/ www.BeachBumHomes.com

 



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